Posted on August 19, 2019 by Ilias Kiritsis

More information has come to light regarding the kidnapping of the 17 seafarers off Douala Anchorage, Cameroon that occurred during the early morning hours of August the 15th.

According to initial reports, the first vessel to be attacked was the Greek-owned, Liberian-flagged Bulk Carrier, VICTORY C. The vessel had arrived at the Douala Outer Anchorage on August 12th.

The attack occurred at approximately 01:30 UTC; 21 seafarers were on board at the time of the attack, and by the time the pirates had left, nine crew members were missing.

Reportedly, the nine crew members are all believed to be Filipino nationals.

The second attack occurred only a few hours after the initial incident. The German-owned, Antigua and Barbuda-flagged General Cargo Vessel, MARMALAITA, which is owned by the Hamburg-based MC-Schiffahrt, had arrived at Douala Outer Anchorage on August the 13th, having sailed from the US via Equatorial Guinea.

The pirates attacked the vessel, kidnapping eight of the twelve crew members in the process. The kidnapped seafarers are thought to be Russian, Filipino and Ukrainian nationals (specifically, three Russians, four Filipinos and a Ukrainian were taken).

“We have assembled our emergency response team and are doing utmost to deal with the case, in cooperation with all relevant authorities and crew managers.”

“Our thoughts reach out to the concerned families, and we will take all efforts to support and assist them until their seafarers safely return back home. All respective authorities have been informed accordingly and we will fully cooperate with them until the case is resolved,” reads the statement from MC-Schiffahrt.

The Cameroonian Navy, which has launched a mission to locate the pirates and rescue the kidnapped seafarers, believes that the pirates hail from Nigeria.

 

Image Courtesy of Marine Traffic

Posted in Security , Piracy , Kidnapping , Attack , Cameroon , Gulf of Guinea

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