Posted on February 14, 2018 by Ashleigh Cowie

EU antitrust regulators are set to fine Nippon Yusen KK (NYK) and several other Japanese shippers as well as Norwegian Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics ASA (WWL) in the coming weeks for rigging bids for shipping cars.

An exclusive report on Reuters claim dawn raids and a six-year investigation by the European Commission led to the EU Sanctions. The investigation took place in September 2012 in coordination with Japanese and U.S. antitrust authorities.

Regulators around the world have enforced similar charges to other companies for fixing prices and dividing the markets for shipping similar products.

Norwegian shipping company Wilh. Wilhelmsen ASA confirmed the raids at its 50 percent-owned Wallenius Wilhelmsen unit and EUKOR, in which it has a 40 percent stake.

Other shippers involved in the case include K Line (Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha Ltd) and Mitsui O.S.K Lines.

The Commission can penalise companies up to 10 percent of their global turnover for breaching EU antitrust rules. It said the services under investigation included shipping cars, construction materials and agricultural machinery.

Japan No. 1 container shipper NYK, K Line and Mitsui in their 2017 annual reports said they were being investigated by competition authorities in Europe.

The EU competition authority and WWL declined to comment. European subsidiaries of the Japanese shippers did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Their parent companies were not immediately available to comment outside office hours.

SIMILAR CASES

WWL took a $200 million provision for all its antitrust cases in the third quarter of 2015, of which $98.5 million was for a U.S. fine, $34 million for a Japanese sanction and $7 million for a Chinese penalty. EUKOR was fined $44 million in the Chinese case.

Australia fined and convicted NYK last year for operating a cartel over vehicle transport to the country.

The Japan Fair Trade Commission in March 2014 handed down fines to NYK, K Line, WWL and Nissan Motor Car Carrier for fixing prices of auto shipments from Japan to North America, Europe and the Middle East while Mitsui escaped a sanction.

The EU competition authority and WWL declined to comment. European subsidiaries of the Japanese shippers did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Their parent companies were not immediately available to comment outside office hours. [Source: Reuters]

Posted in Operations

If you enjoyed this article sign up to our free weekly newsletter here